Asking the Right Questions

Despite sayings to the contrary, we know that perception doesn’t always equal reality. It’s human nature to step across the divide – we want to believe that what we see is fact – and our workplaces are no exception.

 

For example, you might see your meeting rooms consistently occupied – often with one person apparently waiting for others – and your first thought might logically be, ‘we need more meeting rooms!’ Next thing, you’re well down the track planning more. Yet you end up sacrificing communal gathering spaces, and everybody’s dissatisfied. And you throw up your hands and think, ‘Why?’.

 

To solve the issue, you need to not only remember appearances can be deceiving, but also have the ability to consider alternatives.

 

NotYetKnown encourages this open-mindedness through providing our clients with solid evidence and research that will enable you to look deeper into your challenges. In short, we use our knowledge to help you ask the right questions, and point you in the right direction.

 

Almost 10 years ago we set out to achieve this, as part of a long-term goal to give our clients the necessary tools to establish their new workspace requirements. We began building a bank of uniquely New Zealand-centric workplace research and data, drawing from both our independent re:work database (a workplace performance evaluation survey*) and workplace use studies**.

 

So, for those earlier employees in the meeting rooms, our re:work survey might show that they were not meeting but working, away from their (noisy) workpoints, and what they actually valued was uninterrupted time. And our usage studies might show they needed this for only 20% of the day, meaning an individual workpoint might not be necessary at all, but a dedicated library workpoint may be more appropriate.

 

Bridge your perception/reality gap with our data-driven insight. It’s the next best thing to having a mind reader on staff.

 

*re:work seeks users’ perceptions and priorities of workplace factors that affect their performance. Since 2005 re:work has been run with 24 organisations, 5000 employees have participated during 65 separate evaluations.

 

** Utilisation studies record the use of individual and shared workpoints, and gathering spaces. Our studies have included over 3000 workpoint observations with 10 organisations across 26 different sites to date.

Asking the Right Questions

Despite sayings to the contrary, we know that perception doesn’t always equal reality. It’s human nature to step across the divide – we want to believe that what we see is fact – and our workplaces are no exception.

 

For example, you might see your meeting rooms consistently occupied – often with one person apparently waiting for others – and your first thought might logically be, ‘We need more meeting rooms!’ Next thing, you’re well down the track planning more. Yet you end up sacrificing communal gathering spaces, and everybody’s dissatisfied. And you throw up your hands and think, ‘Why?’

 

To solve the issue, you need to not only remember appearances can be deceiving, but also have the ability to consider alternatives. NotYetKnown encourages this open-mindedness through providing our clients with solid evidence and research that will enable you to look deeper into your challenges. In short, we use our knowledge to help you ask the right questions, and point you in the right direction.

 

Almost 10 years ago we set out to achieve this, as part of a long-term goal to give our clients the necessary tools to establish their new workspace requirements. We began building a bank of uniquely New Zealand-centric workplace research and data, drawing from both our independent re:work database (a workplace performance evaluation survey*) and workplace use studies**.

 

So, for those earlier employees in the meeting rooms, our re:work survey might show that they were not meeting but working, away from their (noisy) workpoints, and what they actually valued was uninterrupted time. And our usage studies might show they needed this for only 20% of the day, meaning an individual workpoint might not be necessary at all, but a dedicated library workpoint may be more appropriate.

 

Bridge your perception/reality gap with our data-driven insight. It’s the next best thing to having a mind reader on staff.

 

*re:work seeks users’ perceptions and priorities of workplace factors that affect their performance. Since 2005 re:work has been run with 24 organisations, 5000 employees have participated during 65 separate evaluations.

 

** Utilisation studies record the use of individual and shared workpoints, and gathering spaces. Our studies have included over 3000 workpoint observations with 10 organisations across 26 different sites to date.